Study Italian | Italy | Tuscany | Sienna | Siena
    Russian Japanese Dutch Spanish French German English Italian
  Log in
     
Italy | Tuscany | Siena
  Study in Siena   Home   Who we are   Contact   Program   Courses   Accommodation   Prices   Enrollment   Comments   Interviews   Pdf  
 
  Interviews (38)  
 
 

As she learns Italian and conveys her passion for culture, music and her Italian family, we learn from her wisdom, charm and way of life. In eight years, we have been fortunate to have shared many good times with her and her husband Dale.

 

 

Liz, can you introduce yourself?
- I’m a psychologist and I work as an organization development consultant with organizations, groups or individuals, to improve working relationships and teach creative thinking. I was born and raised in Miami, but after I did a PhD at Michigan State University, my husband Dale and I decided to move to a bigger city with more job opportunities. So we chose Chicago.
They call it the "windy city" right?
- Yes, but it is not because of the wind. It is because in the late 1800’s Chicago competed with New York to bring a world’s fair to Chicago and Chicago’s politicians talked so much that the New Yorkers nicknamed Chicago “The Windy City” because of them.
That’s surprising! Tell us more about Chicago.
- The architecture there is very special, because it was the place in which skyscrapers were invented. To this day many say it is one of the most beautiful cities. It sits on Lake Michigan and the lakefront is completely open for 18 miles, because of a city law made after the great Chicago fire. It’s fabulous. We live in a little town right next to Chicago called Oak Park, where Frank Lloyd Wright began his career as an architect and where Ernest Hemingway was born. It's beautiful.
Your children were raised there?
- Yes. Our daughter, Brenna, is a professional dancer and a modern dance teacher. Our son, Jonathan, studied art for eight months in Florence, so he speaks very well!
They’re both artists. Is art important in your family?
- Yes! I studied music and dance when I was young. I played the piano and my husband Dale was a trumpet player. So for us it was very important for the kids to be exposed to a cultural life and both of them began dancing when they were three years old. Jonathan also dances with a dance company in Chicago and, like his father, is very good at mathematics. Brenna, like me, is not so good [laughing].
What an artistic family! Do you still play the piano?
- Not very much. We go to the theatre, and to concerts. The Chicago Symphony is one of the best in the world. We go to hear jazz. We love music. It’s very important to have a break, to enjoy the finer things in life, the things that remind us that human beings are good.
And between work and culture, why did you choose to study Italian?
- Both of my parents were Italian, but they never learned Italian as children, just a few words that their parents spoke to them. My grandmother spoke to my mother in Sicilian and she answered in English. My parents were sent to school to learn English and they were made to believe that they shouldn’t speak Italian. They needed to become “Americans,” and fit in. There was a lot of anti-Italian sentiment; this was true even in the 1920’s and 30’s, and worse during the war.
Do you think that this has changed through the years?
- Well, there are still stereotypes, like the "The Sopranos," and in movies about the mafia. For me it is disturbing. The mafia exists, but there are also a lot of wonderful Italians in the United States, important figures like the mayor of New York, Fiorello La Guardia, and many others. I recommend a wonderful new documentary series on Public Television called "The Italian-Americans," about their lives in the United States. It's very well done.
When you were drawn to Italian culture?
- I never had the experience that many Italian-Americans had with extended family because my parents moved far away from their brothers and sisters to Miami. Then I saw my children learning Italian at college. My daughter went to Juilliard and learned Italian as one of the languages of opera. Jonathan studied in Florence. He lived there with an Italian family. I decided to study a little bit on my own. Then I knew I wanted to come and study in Italy.
How long ago did you make that decision?
- In 2008, when we were going to visit my son in Florence.  I didn’t want him to feel that his mother landed on top of him, you know? So I decided to pick another city near Florence and a friend of mine told me, “Siena is the most beautiful city in the world." So I went online and I found Saena Iulia. I asked if I could stay just for one week and they said “f course!” This one-week opportunity was the first sign of the great flexibility that this school and these teachers have.
And how was it when you arrived?
- I came here and I fell in love with Siena, with the school, the teachers, and I thought, "This is where I want to be from now on.” One day I was sitting in this classroom with Sabrina, looking out the window, and thinking, “Look where I am. I can't believe it." Suddenly I realized I’m honoring my grandparents, who left everything because they wanted to give us a better life, and here I am, having a better lif.

What a beautiful thought.  The least I can do is to learn their language, to say thanks.

Now you’re here at the school for the eighth time. Why have you returned so many times?
- I knew I always had to come back here, just for the poeple alone-Mauro, Sabrina, Elettra-unbelievable people. They’re like family now. And Dale, my husband, came the next year with me. He didn’t want to study the language but they were always so welcoming to him. They invited him to all the activities of the school; the coffee break, the excursions, lunch. So when he retires he thinks he’ll study here.
What’s your favorite thing about this experience?
- The people in the school. They're the best.  They understand so well how to teach adults well and with love. They’re so generous and intelligent in what they do. I would never want to be in any other place. And I’ve sent so many people here, too, whenever anybody asks where am I learning Italian.
So this is your home away from home
- Exactly, and it is so beautiful to have that. I’m very grateful.
We’re grateful to have you as part of Saena Iulia family. Thank you, Liz.
- Thank you! 

 

 
 

Liz, puoi presentarti in breve?
- Sono psicologa e lavoro come consulente con gruppi o singoli, per migliorare i rapporti e sviluppare il loro pensiero creativo. Sono nata e cresciuta a Miami, ma dopo ho fatto un PhD all’Università statale in Michigan e con mio marito, Dale, abbiamo deciso di trasferirci in una città grande con più possibilità di lavoro e abbiamo scelto Chicago.
La chiamano “la città ventosa”, vero?
- Sì, ma non perché sia ventosa, sai? È perché alla fine dell'Ottocento Chicago ha gareggiato con New York per portare una fiera mondiale a Chicago. I politici di Chicago ne hanno parlato così tanto che i newyorkesi l'hanno soprannominata “la città ventosa” a causa di questi politici.
Ma che sorpresa, non lo sapevamo! Puoi parlarci un po’ più di Chicago?
- L’architettura è molto speciale, perché i grattacieli sono stati inventati lì. Fino ad oggi, si dice che sia una delle città più belle, il lungolago del lago Michigan è completamente aperto per 28 kilometri, perché hanno fatto una legge dopo il grande incendio di Chicago. È veramente favoloso. Noi viviamo in un piccolo paese vicino a Chicago, si chiama Oak Park, dove ha cominciato la carriera  l’architetto  Frank Lloyd Wright e dove è nato Ernest Hemingway. É molto bello.
I tuoi figli sono cresciuti lì?
- Sì. Nostra figlia si chiama Brenna, lei è una ballerina e anche insegnante di ballo. Nostro figlio, Jonathan, ha studiato arte a Firenze per 8 mesi, quindi parla l’italiano molto bene!
Sono entrambi artisti! L’arte è molto importante nella tua famiglia?
- Certo! Ho studiato musica e ballo quando ero giovane, suonavo il pianoforte e mio marito la tromba, quindi per noi era molto importante che i nostri figli fossero vicini alla cultura. Entrambi hanno preso lezioni di ballo quando avevano tre anni. Oggi anche Jonathan balla in una compagnia di ballo a Chicago e come suo padre, è molto bravo in matematica, invece io, come mia figlia, non molto! [ridendo]
Una famiglia proprio artistica! Suoni ancora il pianoforte?
- Non troppo. Andiamo a teatro, ai concerti, a vedere l'Orchestra Sinfonica di Chicago che è una delle migliori del mondo, ad ascoltare jazz, amiamo la musica. Per noi è molto importante fare una pausa dal lavoro, godersi le cose belle della vita, le cose che ti ricordano che gli esseri umani sono buoni.
E fra il lavoro e l’arte, perché hai scelto di studiare l’italiano?
- I miei genitori erano italiani, ma loro non hanno imparato l’italiano da bambini, soltanto un paio di parole che gli hanno insegnato i loro genitori. Mia nonna parlava con la mia mamma in siciliano e lei rispondeva in inglese! I miei genitori sono andati a scuola per imparare l’inglese e gli dicevano che non dovevano parlare italiano per poter diventare “americani”. A quel tempo c’era un forte sentimento anti italiano, specialmente negli anni '20 e '30 e anche peggio durante la guerra.
Pensi che oggi questo sentimento sia cambiato?
- Oggi ci sono anche degli stereotipi, per esempio The Sopranos, i film sulla mafia … per me è molto disgustoso, certo che c’è la mafia ma ci sono anche degli italiani molto bravi negli Stati Uniti, come l'ex sindaco di New York, Fiorello La Guardia, tra gli altri. Vi consiglio di guardare una bella serie di documentari, si chiama The Italians-Americans, sulla loro vita negli Stati Uniti, molto bello.
Da quando sei interessata alla cultura italiana?
- Quando ero piccola non ho avuto un’esperienza come quella che di solito hanno gli italo-americani, perché noi ci siamo trasferiti lontano dai miei zii, a Miami. Dopo ho visto i miei figli imparare l’italiano: mia figlia ha studiato danza a Juilliard, dove insegnano la lingua dell’Opera e mio figlio a Firenze, dove è vissuto con una famiglia italiana. Ho deciso di imparare un po’ e dopo di venire a studiare in Italia.
Quanto tempo fa hai preso questa bella decisione?
- Nel 2008, volevamo venire a visitare mio figlio che viveva a Firenze, ma non volevo che lui pensasse che la sua mamma era addosso a lui … quindi, ho cercato una città italiana vicina a Firenze e una amica mi ha detto: “Siena è la città più bella del mondo”. Ho cercato in internet ed ho trovato Saena Iulia. Ho domandato se potevo fare un corso di una settimana e mi hanno risposto: “certo”! Quest’opportunità è stata un segno della grande flessibilità che hanno in questa Scuola.
E quando sei arrivata, com'era?
- Sono arrivata e subito mi sono innamorata di Siena, della Scuola, degli insegnanti e ho pensato: “questo è il posto dove voglio essere d'ora in poi”… un giorno ero seduta in questa classe con Sabrina, guardavo fuori dalla finestra e pensavo “guarda dove sono, non ci credo” … e mi sono resa conto che stando qui onoravo la memoria dei miei nonni, che si erano lasciati tutto dietro le spalle per darci una vita migliore … adesso sono qui, vivendo una vita migliore.
Ma che bel pensiero…
- Il minimo che posso fare è imparare la loro lingua, per ringraziarli …
Questa è la tua ottava volta a Scuola. Perché sei tornata tante volte?
- Sapevo che sarei sempre tornata, basta soltanto pensare alle persone che puoi trovare qui, Mauro, Sabri, Elettra … persone fantastiche. Adesso sono come la mia famiglia. E Dale, mio marito, è venuto con me l’anno scorso, non voleva studiare ma qui sono sempre stati così gentili con lui, l'hanno invitato a tutte le attività della scuola, pause, gite, pranzo. Quando sarà in pensione, vorrebbe studiare qui.
Qual è la tua cosa preferita in questa esperienza?
- Le persone a scuola sono esseri umani meravigliosi. Loro capiscono così bene come insegnare agli adulti e come farlo con amore. Sono generosi ed intelligenti. Non vorrei essere in nessun altro posto. Ho consigliato a tante persone di venire qui, a chiunque mi domandi dove imparare l’italiano.
Quindi, questa è la tua casa lontano da casa …
- Certo, ed è così bello averla. Sono molto fortunata.
E noi siamo fortunati ad averti nella nostra famiglia Saena Iulia, grazie Liz.
- Grazie a voi!

 

 

Fuyuki Maruyama

Japan

 
Frederik Furrer

Switzerland

 
Matthias Reichert

Germany

 
Alice Curran

United States

 
Julie Cobb Millazzo

United States

 
Donna Theresa Youngblood

United States

 
Camille Buccellato

United States

 
Elizabeth Monroe-Cook

United States

 
Franca Leeson

Canada

 
Tim Hurson

Canada

 
Antoinette Lobbato/Nelson

United States

 
Ulrike Wilson

United Kingdom

 
Anka Looft

Germany

 
Jennifer Hötzl

Germany

 
Leanne Atley

Canada

 
Chisa Iura

Japan

 
Michael Volino

United States

 
Kathleen De Palma

United States

 
Viktor Turad

Germany

 
Julia Szuliman

Hungary

 
Bruce Baltzer

United States

 
Robert Comazzi

United States

 
Agustín Denegri

Chile

 
Małgorzata Berndt

Poland

 
Agnieszka Lizon-Baran

Poland

 
Rosemary Martelli

United States

 
Melissa Mellot

United States

 
Gillian Verma

United Kingdom

 
Maria Buser

Switzerland

 
Ian McDonald

United Kingdom

 
Frank Brinkmann

Germany

 
Veronique De Bruyne

Belgium

 
Ana Carolina Belibasis

Honduras

 
Sandro Presta

Switzerland

 
Sabrina Oertel

Germany

 
Stephanie Feder

United States

 
Emma Kate Argiro

Australia

 
Robert Totty

United Kingdom

 
 
 
  Study online   Area Studio   Italian verbs   Dictionaries   Newspapers   Radio   Tv
© Scuola Saena Iulia Via Monna Agnese, 20 - 53100 Siena - Italia +39 0577 44155 www.saenaiulia.it info@saenaiulia.it saenaiulia
  Link   Schools in Italy   Schools in the world   Partner schools   Italian Cultural Institutes   Italian Embassies   Embassies in Italy